CSD again leading social innovation: New book on productive aging in Chinese

In the decades ahead, China will have a very large older population, with many older adults who are relatively healthy and interested in being actively engaged in their communities. Contributions of older adults will be necessary for social and economic development of families, communities and society.

At conference, Chinese, Americans share best practices on productive aging

Population aging is a major concern across the globe, and nowhere is the challenge more daunting than in China. Whereas the United States currently has an estimated 36 million seniors age 65 and older, China already has 208 million seniors (defined in that country as age 60 or older).

As China faces challenges of aging population, new book offers insights, innovations

As the global population ages, the concept of “productive aging” offers a new perspective on meeting the challenges of an aging society. In contrast to conventional views of aging, “productive aging” views older adults as participants in and contributors to social development, rather than passive recipients of services.

Conference on productive aging in China to be held at Peking University

In August, over 300 gerontology scholars from mainland China, the US, Japan, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore as well as governments officials and practitioners from the China National Committee on Aging and the Ministry of Civil Affairs will come together at Peking University to discuss strategies to address population aging.

CSD co-sponsors productive aging conference

In August 2009, international gerontology scholars gathered in China to address the challenge of initiating research and policy innovations that will support older adults in being actively engaged and harness their contributions for the betterment of families, communities, and society.

Productive Aging Conference Report

Morrow-Howell, N., Gao, J., Zou, L., & Xie, Y. (2009). Productive aging conference report (CSD Conference Report No. 09-51). St. Louis, MO: Washington University, Center for Social Development.